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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: once again today, debt-laden governments in europe grappled with massive public anger over austerity measures they'd imposed. in greece, the government won a bitter struggle today to rein in debt for bailout help. and in britain, civil servants took the streets. a tense calm returned to athens, greece today, but shards of glass lay strewn on the sidewalks and charred debris was stacked in the streets. they were the remnants of riots that raged into the night as protesters set fires and battled police, who fought back with clouds of tear gas. even so, the greek parliament voted today to implement the austerity measures it had endorsed yesterday. the international
opportunity to do something big. >> suarez: but after five straight days of talks with congressional leaders, president obama conceded today something big remains elusive. >> we are obviously running out of time. and so what i've said to the members of congress is that you need, over the next 24 to 36 hours, to give me some sense of what your plan is to get the debt ceiling raised through if they show me a serious plan, i'm ready to move, even if it requires some tough decisions on my part. >> suarez: the president had previously insisted on extending the debt ceiling through 2012 past next year's election. but after thursday's talks, he settled for asking congressional leaders to review three options with their members. the first-- the so-called "grand bargain" that mr. obama favors-- would cut deficits by about $4 trillion dollars, including spending cuts and new tax revenues. a medium-range plan would aim to reduce the deficit by about half that amount. the smallest option would cut between $1 trillion and $1.5 trillion dollars without increased tax revenue or any medicare and medicaid cu
a big jobs generator, the place they call the space coast. but in particular today i spent some time talking with travis thompson who has spent 33 years here at the kennedy space center working on the shuttle program. he is the lead technician on the clogout crew, the guys who button them up, the astronauts, strap them in, shut the door and send them off to space. he and his team, it was a very emotional day for them. as they were finishing up their job they had put together a series of cards with messages talking about their appreciation for the program, their patted rotism and frankly -- patriotism and their sadness, and the final word was god bless america, held by travis thompson himself. this is travis thompson's last day on the job, after 100 shuttle missions, getting the crews strapped in and ready to go to space, tomorrow he has no job. where he is going to go to work. as he said, my job is putting human beings in spacecraft to go to space. i don't see a lot of prospects for doing that somewhere else. so it is a poignant moment for him. >> so finally, miles, look back with us
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
for the auto industry. we examine the new round of labor talks between the u.a.w. and detroit's big three. >> ifill: ray suarez gets an update on the turmoil in libya. >> brown: and we close with a paul solman story about a convicted murderer and middle school dropout who now makes $80,000 a year after completing college while behind bars. >> these are my dreams. i fit in right here, but this is what i'm looking at, this is where i want to be, this is where i can be, this is where i deserve to be. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scie
, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and
was the big question. it was cleveland himself who recommended going on a boat. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: senate democrats vowed to stay in session around the clock to resolve the debt crisis. house republicans modified their plan
planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: much talk, but little movement: the high-stakes debt and deficit impasse continued today, and last night's dueling primetime speeches by president obama and speaker boehner only seemed to reinforce the bitter stalemate over raising the country's borrowing limit. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: it was house speaker john boehner who had the last word
alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: twin bombings shattered the calm in a city north of baghdad today. more than three dozen iraqis were killed, with 50 or more wounded. it was the latest sign of rising violence as u.s. troops prepare to withdraw. the charred remains of a car bomb littered a street in the city of taji this afternoon. it blew up in the parking lot of a local government building, damaging nearby businesses and killing dozens of people. as ambulanc
. and this going on in washington is a big part of the reason why. before i served in congress i ran a small business in ohio. i was amazed at how different washington d.c. operated than every other business in america. where most american businesses make the hard choices to pay their bills, live within their means. in washington, more spending and more debt is business as usual. well, i've got news for washington, those days are over. president obama came to congress in january and requested businesses as usual. he had ner routine increase in the national debt, but we in the house said not so fast. here was a president asking for the largest debt increase in american history on the heels of the largest spending binge in american history. and here's what we got for that massive spending binge. a new health-care bill that most americans never asked for. a stimulus bill that's more effective in producing material for late night comedians than it was in producing jobs. and a national debt that has gotten so out of hand it sparked a crisis without precedent in my lifetime or yours. the united st
as the big three, and command a 93% share of the market. they look at the books of businesses and countries and judge how able they are to pay back financial observations. in a complex internet -- international economy, this information is vital to investors. when the bretton woods system of monetary management fell apart in the 1970's, the role of ratings agencies became even more important. the u.s. government gave them the task of assuring financial reliability. the european union has also require banks to increase capital in line with risk exposure. that risk is measured by the ratings agencies. >> the influence of ratings agencies lies on the one hand in the way their evaluation system has been incorporated into legislation. on the other hand, many business contracts are tied to the marks of the ratings agencies. that means certain private investors will only invest if there is a certain rating. >> one such example is the insurance giant allianz, which relies on ratings agencies to invest huge amounts of capital. but that system historically failed on a massive scale and when the agenc
the big stumbling block right now is the president's insistence on raising taxes. and i think we need to go back two years ago in 2009 when president obama was asked in indiana do you raise tacks during a recession. and he very eloquently i think answered the question. and he said no, don't do that. and he laid out the economic reasons for not doing that. now look, this economy is begging for mercy. we're at 9.2% unemployment. an i think it's time to move off of this notion that somehow the remedy is to increase taxes on job creators. let's focus in on these cuts. let's make thoughtful and wise cuts and let's come together on this in a fashion that makes sense all the way around. >> ifill: listening to both sides of this debate it seems one man's taxes are another man's revenue increases and it's a question of whether you are talking about raising net taxes or not -- or increasing revenues at all. you could imagine that the average viewer trying to make sense of this doesn't know which definition you are talking about. >> here's the definition i think that should be guiding us. the jo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)

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